Reference: EASA Air Ops – Part NCO Summary

Air-Ops

Annex VII – Part-NCO (Non-Commercial Air Operations Other Than Complex Motor -Powered Aircraft)

Required Documents to be Carried (NCO.GEN.135)

(a)  The following documents, manuals and information shall be carried on each flight as originals or copies unless otherwise specified:

  1.  the AFM, or equivalent document(s);
  2.  the original certificate of registration;
  3. the original certificate of airworthiness (CofA);
  4.  the noise certificate, if applicable;
  5. the list of specific approvals, if applicable;
  6.  the aircraft radio licence, if applicable;
  7. the third party liability insurance certificate(s);
  8.  the journey log, or equivalent, for the aircraft;
  9. details of the filed ATS flight plan, if applicable;
  10. current and suitable aeronautical charts for the route area of the proposed flight and all routes along which it is reasonable to expect that the flight may be diverted;
  11. procedures and visual signals information for use by intercepting and intercepted aircraft;
  12. the MEL or CDL, if applicable; and
  13. any other documentation that may be pertinent to the flight or is required by the States concerned with the flight.

(b)  Notwithstanding (a), on flights:

  1. intending to take off and land at the same aerodrome/operating site; or
  2. remaining within a distance or area determined by the competent authority,

the documents and information in (a)(2) to (a)(8) may be retained at the aerodrome or operating site.

Alternate Aerdromes

Isolated Aerodromes (NCO.OP.15)

For the selection of alternate aerodromes and the fuel policy, the pilot-in-command shall consider an aerodrome as an isolated aerodrome if the flying time to the nearest adequate destination alternate aerodrome is more than.

  1. (a)  for aeroplanes with reciprocating engines, 60 minutes; or
  2. (b)  for aeroplanes with turbine engines, 90 minutes.

Fuel and Oil Minima (NCO.OP.126)

(a) The pilot-in-command shall only commence a flight if the aeroplane carries sufficient fuel and oil for the following:

  1. (1)  for visual flight rules (VFR) flights:
    1. (i)  by day, taking-off and landing at the same aerodrome/landing site and always remaining in sight of that aerodrome/landing site, to fly the intended route and thereafter for at least 10 minutes at normal cruising altitude;
    2. (ii)  by day, to fly to the aerodrome of intended landing and thereafter to fly for at least 30 minutes at normal cruising altitude; or
    3. (iii)  by night, to fly to the aerodrome of intended landing and thereafter to fly for at least 45 minutes at normal cruising altitude;
  2. (2)  for IFR flights:
    1. (i)  when no destination alternate is required, to fly to the aerodrome of intended landing and thereafter to fly for at least 45 minutes at normal cruising altitude; or
    2. (ii)  when a destination alternate is required, to fly to the aerodrome of intended landing, to an alternate aerodrome and thereafter to fly for at least 45 minutes at normal cruising altitude.

In computing the fuel required including to provide for contingency, the following shall be taken into consideration:

  1. (1) forecast meteorological conditions;
  1. (2)  anticipated ATC routings and traffic delays;
  2. (3)  procedures for loss of pressurisation or failure of one engine while en-route, where applicable; and
  3. (4)  any other condition that may delay the landing of the aeroplane or increase fuel and/or oil consumption.

(c) Nothing shall preclude amendment of a flight plan in-flight, in order to re-plan the flight to another destination, provided that all requirements can be complied with from the point where the flight is re-planned.

 Destination Alternates (NCO.OP.140)

For IFR flights, the pilot-in-command shall specify at least one weather-permissible destination alternate aerodrome in the flight plan, unless:

  1. (a)  the available current meteorological information indicates that, for the period from 1 hour before until 1 hour after the estimated time of arrival, or from the actual time of departure to 1 hour after the estimated time of arrival, whichever is the shorter period, the approach and landing may be made under visual meteorological conditions (VMC); or
  2. (b)  the place of intended landing is isolated and:

(1) an instrument approach procedure is prescribed for the aerodrome of intended landing; and

(2) available current meteorological information indicates that the following meteorological conditions will exist from 2 hours before to 2 hours after the estimated time of arrival:

  1. (i)  a cloud base of at least 300 m (1 000 ft) above the minimum associated with the instrument approach procedure; and
  2. (ii)  visibility of at least 5,5 km or of 4 km more than the minimum associated with the procedure.

Meteorological Conditions (NCO.OP.160)

  1. (a)  The pilot-in-command shall only commence or continue a VFR flight if the latest available meteorological information indicates that the weather conditions along the route and at the intended destination at the estimated time of use will be at or above the applicable VFR operating minima.
  2. (b)  The pilot-in-command shall only commence or continue an IFR flight towards the planned destination aerodrome if the latest available meteorological information indicates that, at the estimated time of arrival, the weather conditions at the destination or at least one destination alternate aerodrome are at or above the applicable aerodrome operating minima.
  3. (c)  If a flight contains VFR and IFR segments, the meteorological information referred to in (a) and (b) shall be applicable as far as relevant.

Flight Over Water (NCO.IDE.A.175)

  1. (a)  The following aeroplanes shall be equipped with a life-jacket for each person on board, or equivalent individual floatation device for each person on board younger than 24 months, that shall be worn or stowed in a position that is readily accessible from the seat or berth of the person for whose use it is provided:
    1. (1)  single-engined landplanes when:
      1. (i)  flying over water beyond gliding distance from land; or
      2. (ii)  taking off or landing at an aerodrome or operating site where, in the opinion of the pilot-in-command, the take-off or approach path is so disposed over water that there would be a likelihood of a ditching;
    2. (2)  seaplanes operated over water; and
    3. (3)  aeroplanes operated at a distance away from land where an emergency landing is possible greater than that corresponding to 30 minutes at normal cruising speed or 50 NM, whichever is less.
  2. (b)  Seaplanes operated over water shall be equipped with:
    1. (1)  one anchor;
    2. (2)  one sea anchor (drogue), when necessary to assist in manoeuvring; and
    3. (3)  equipment for making the sound signals, as prescribed in the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, where applicable.
  3. (c)  The pilot-in-command of an aeroplane operated at a distance away from land where an emergency landing is possible greater than that corresponding to 30 minutes at normal cruising speed or 50 NM, whichever is the lesser, shall determine the risks to survival of the occupants of the aeroplane in the event of a ditching, based on which he/she shall determine the carriage of:
    1. (1)  equipment for making the distress signals;
    2. (2)  life-rafts in sufficient numbers to carry all persons on board, stowed so as to facilitate their ready use in emergency; and
    3. (3)  life-saving equipment, to provide the means of sustaining life, as appropriate to the flight to be undertaken.

References

Air Ops, Annex I to VIII, 4th edition, May 2016

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